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Daniel Kay, Attorney at Law

What is the difference between a felony and misdemeanor in Illinois?

In Illinois, there are two types of crimes: felonies and misdemeanors. Felonies are more serious crimes, punishable by imprisonment in a state penitentiary. Misdemeanors are less serious crimes, punishable by a fine or imprisonment in the county jail. Some offenses can be charged as either a felony or misdemeanor, depending on the severity and the defendant’s criminal history.

What is the difference between a felony and misdemeanor in Illinois?

A felony is a more serious crime that is punishable by imprisonment for more than one year.

A felony is typically classified as a crime that involves violence, such as murder, rape, or robbery. However, some felonies may also be classified as white-collar crimes, such as embezzlement or money laundering. In most jurisdictions, a felony is punishable by a prison sentence of more than one year. In some cases, a felony may also be punishable by death. Although the exact definition of a felony varies by jurisdiction, it is generally considered to be a more serious offense than a misdemeanor.

A misdemeanor is a less serious crime that is punishable by imprisonment for less than one year.

When most people hear the word “crime,” they think of a felony. A felony is a serious crime that is punishable by imprisonment for more than one year. But there is another type of crime that is not as serious: a misdemeanor. A misdemeanor is a less serious crime that is punishable by imprisonment for less than one year. Examples of misdemeanors include petty theft, disorderly conduct, and trespass. Misdemeanors are often heard in small claims court or traffic court. If you are convicted of a misdemeanor, you may have to pay a fine, but you will not be sent to prison. In some states, you may be able to have your record expunged after a certain period of time. So if you’ve ever been charged with a crime, be sure to ask your lawyer whether it’s a felony or a misdemeanor.

There are different degrees of felonies and misdemeanors, depending on the severity of the crime.

If you are convicted of a felony or misdemeanor, you will have a criminal record.

If you’re convicted of a crime, even a misdemeanor, there are repercussions beyond your sentance:

  • Being ineligible for government assistance.
  • Discrimination in housing.
  • Challenges getting a job.
  • Ineligibility for a job.
  • Owning a gun

YOU ARE STILL ELEGIBLE TO VOTE IN ILLINOIS IF YOU HAVE A CRIMINAL RECORD. The only time you can’t vote is when you’re serving your sentence. You can vote on probation, parole, when you’ve been arrested, charged, or even on trial.

If you have any questions in Illinois, call Daniel Kay at 618-596-3247.

Photo by EKATERINA BOLOVTSOVA: https://www.pexels.com/photo/lady-justice-and-a-gavel-6077123/

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